If you think someone you know has experienced a hate crime there are lots of ways in which you can help them. 

Understanding the behaviours associated with hate crimes is a good place to start. Most people will usually describe what has or is happening to them and how it's making them feel. 

Hate incidents and hate crime are acts of verbal abuse, intimidation or violence against a person or property motivated by hostility or prejudice due to a particular characteristic. This could be a disability, race or ethnicity, religion or belief, sexual orientation, transgender identity or an alternative sub-culture hate crime. A victim does not have to be a member of the group at which the hostility is targeted. In fact, anyone could be a victim of a hate crime. 

Hate incidents and crimes include bullying, harassment and sexual harassment, which are contrary to the Equality Act 2010 and the University’s Dignity at Work and Study Policy. Find out more about bullying and harassment and sexual harassment.

                                  Think 


Are they in immediate danger? If they are in immediate danger or seriously injured, you can call 999 (or 112 from a mobile).  If they are on campus, you should tell Security (01483 683333) that the emergency services are on their way and give details of the individual’s location.  

Find a safe space: if an incident has just happened, try and find somewhere they feel safe. If they are on campus and this isn't possible, you can suggest they call Security on 01483 683333. 

What is a hate crime? It might be useful to think about what hate crime is and how some of the behaviours are described. 

                                   Talk 


Listen: just taking the time to listen to someone and talk about what has happened can help. These six active listening tips might help you to support them. 

Give options: when they have finished talking, ask them if they are ok to talk through some possible options.  

Security: our Security team can talk through how to make a report and what support is available. 

University of Surrey Students Union (USSU) can talk through what options are available and support students through the process. This support includes checking draft complaints and attending any meetings with the University. 

Trade unions are organised groups of workers who come together to support each other in the workplace. The University of Surrey recognises three campus trade unions (Unison, UCU and Unite) and encourages all employees to become members. 

                                Report 


Police: if you want to report directly to the police you can call 101 which is the non-emergency telephone number (staffed 24/7). You can also call 101 to get support or advice. Surrey Police have an online form for reporting hate crime. 

Report and Support: students and staff can report an incident using the University’s Report and Support system. You can choose to do this anonymously or you can request support from a member of staff. 

                            Get support 

Take care of yourself: it’s important that you take care of yourself. If you’ve heard something distressing or if something is troubling you, the University's Centre for Wellbeing offers confidential help and is open to both students and staff free of charge.  
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There are two ways you can report something